Risks Of Air Pollutions Inside Our House

January 22, 2015 News

Health experts often cite indoor air pollutions as a significant health problem, and they often rank it among most common environmental risks that can affect average people. The very place that we typically want to feel really secure can make us ill and it could cause multiple life-threatening diseases. It has been identified that over 3,000 substances are detected in indoor air and they are potentially major health hazards. Radon gas, asbestos, lead paint, carbon monoxide and formaldehyde are considered as major contributors to many cases of indoor air pollution. Health experts also specify that indoor air can be about ten times more harmful than outdoor air.

As much as 10,000 people died each year due to serious indoor air pollution. There are virtually no significant chronic diseases to which our environmental factors don’t contribute, both directly or indirectly. It is required that manufacturers and building owners put warning labels in any manufactured houses that can potentially cause indoor air pollution, because some of the materials may still release toxic fumes. Experts also reported that people who live in newer homes may have 50 percent higher chances of getting respiratory infection than people living in older homes. One common problem with today’s homes are that they are built tighter to become more energy efficient. However, this efficiency may not allow the interior to expel the bad, toxic air that may accumulate. In the winter, trapped air could circulate throughout our house.

Risks Of Air Pollutions Inside Our House

A common source of lead contamination is usually walls with lead-based paint. Kids are at the biggest risk from breathing paint dust or eating paint chips. Adults can be exposed much more often in their workplace, especially in typical construction sites. Kids and adults can be progressively exposed to higher amounts of lead fumes during any degree of renovations when paint must be sanded off. The effect of lead poisoning on children is usually much more serious than older individuals because of their small body size and faster metabolism. Prolonged exposure to lead may cause permanent or temporary or permanent developmental problems. If lead continues to accumulate in our kidneys and liver, it may cause dysfunctions and eventually catastrophic failures. Lead may also cause blood-related diseases. Many common symptoms of lead poisoning may include irritability, joint pains, loss of appetite and increased fatigue. Lead is typically removed from the bloodstream with penicillamine or EDTA. But, things can be much more serious if it trace amounts of lead start to get into the bone structures. It has 20-year half-life, it will be difficult to achieve low blood levels. Radon gas is produced by decaying uranium. As uranium slowly changes into radon gas, it will move through the soil and escape into the air. It is mixed any interior air, especially in basement. Although it may get diluted to lower levels, radon can eventually pose significant threats to our health. Radon gas may get trapped in our house and accumulate to dangerous and harmful levels